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<address>© Frank Glorius</address>
© Frank Glorius

Otto-Roelen Medal for chemist Frank Glorius

Prof. Frank Glorius from Münster University receives the Otto-Roelen Medal 2020. The prize is awarded by the DECHEMA and the German Catalysis Society in recognition of his developments in the field of chemo- and stereoselective hydrogenation of aromatics. The award ceremony will take place on 12 March during the Annual Meeting of German Catalysis Scientists in Weimar.

<address>© WWU - MünsterView/Kahtrin Nolte</address>
© WWU - MünsterView/Kahtrin Nolte

University museums: positioned between research, teaching and the public

At the University of Münster the transfer of knowledge into society also takes place through the Archaeological Museum and the Bible Museum. In this guest commentary, Prof. Hermann Parzinger, President of the Stiftung Preußischer Kulturbesitz, describes the collections as a showcase for research.

he reproducibility of research results is one of the fundamental quality criteria in science.<address>© Helloquence on Unsplash</address>
© Helloquence on Unsplash

"A rethinking in the minds of researchers is necessary"

The reproducibility of research results is one of the fundamental quality criteria in science. The demand for transparency of the scientific knowledge process aims to ensure the repeatability of scientific studies or experiments. In four guest comments, scientists describe how the topic of reproducibility of research results is handled in their field.

Veranstaltungen

Planetologists Prof. Addi Bischoff (left) and Markus Patzek with the meteorite &quot;Flensburg&quot; in front of the scanning electron microscope.<address>© WWU - Michael C. Möller</address>
© WWU - Michael C. Möller

First research results on the "spectacular meteorite fall" of Flensburg

A fireball in the sky, accompanied by a bang, amazed hundreds of eyewitnesses in northern Germany in mid-September last year. The reason for the spectacle was a meteoroid entering the Earth's atmosphere and partially burning up. Experts at the “Institut für Planetologie” at Münster University have been studying a part of the meteorite.

Münster University&#039;s Rector Prof. Johannes Wessels (left) and his Dutch colleague Prof. Thom Palstra.<address>© WWU - Peter Leßmann</address>
© WWU - Peter Leßmann

"Collaboration Grants": a funding instrument used jointly by the Universities of Münster and Twente

The Universities of Twente (UT) and Münster (WWU) have maintained a close partnership for many years. Now they want to deepen their strategic partnership and identify further cooperation and strengthen existing research networks. A three-part series highlights special features and plans of the partnership. Part III: Research cooperation and "Collaboration Grants".

Regenerative sources of energy such as wind, solar and biogas are a key component in any future recycling-based economy in which products are made from regenerative raw materials and are also then biodegradable.<address>© lassedesignen - stock.adobe.com</address>
© lassedesignen - stock.adobe.com

Science Year 2020: "Bioeconomy has many facets"

With climate change, the declining availability of arable land, and dwindling fossil resources, the ecological challenges worldwide are huge. The German Ministry of Education and Research has therefore dedicated Science Year 2020 to the issue of "Bioeconomy". Researchers at the University of Münster are also working on aspects of the subject.

Measurement setup for the characterization of microbridges in a cryostat<address>© Martin Wolff</address>
© Martin Wolff

Quantum technologies: New insights into superconducting processes

Superconductors are regarded as promising components for quantum computers, but so far they only function at very low temperatures. Scientists at Münster University now, for the first time, demonstrated a so-called energy quantization in nanowires of high-temperature superconductors. The study has been published in the journal "Nature Communications".

Model of the enzyme chitosan deacetylase (turquoise) with its substrate chitosan (light green) bound in its active site<address>© Martin Bonin</address>
© Martin Bonin

The invisibility cloak of a fungus

The human immune system can easily recognize fungi because their cells are surrounded by a solid cell wall of chitin and other complex sugars. Researchers at Münster University found out that a fungal pathogen, Cryptococcus neoformans, uses an enzyme to hide from the human immune system. The study was published in the journal "PNAS".

During the Arab Spring, thousands of Tunisian demonstrators take to the streets of the capital, Tunis, in January 2011, to demand the resignation of the President.<address>© dpa - Lucas Dolega</address>
© dpa - Lucas Dolega

Thomas Apolte on the modern myth of revolution

After the disaster of the Arab Spring, the modern myth of revolution initially lost some of its attractiveness, but the myth has been revived again in the wake of the latest wave of mass protests in many countries across the world. In this guest commentary for the University newspaper wissen|leben, Prof. Thomas Apolte takes a look at the issue, which is also the subject of his latest book.

1_Gastbeitrag_Quante Logo engl.jpg<address>© WWU - Peter Wattendorff</address>
© WWU - Peter Wattendorff

Michael Quante on the new dossier "Knowledge Transfer at the University of Münster"

The creation of knowledge and its transfer to society is part of the public cultural heritage and therefore a central goal of the University of Münster. Whether museums, senior guest programme and children's university, support for start-ups, teacher education or science communication: The University of Münster understands knowledge transfer as an active exchange.

<address>© GUCC grafik & film</address>
© GUCC grafik & film

“Transfer is not something you do in your spare time”

Knowledge transfer at German universities has been becoming increasingly important for some years now and, more and more, is being recognized as an academic achievement. Dr. Annette Barkhaus, deputy head of the Research Department at the German Council of Science and Humanities, describes in an interview the challenges of knowledge transfer for German universities and research institutions.

<address>© Sergey Mukhametov</address>
© Sergey Mukhametov

Bringing research and teaching closer to society

Whether it is citizen science, the creation of a climate conducive to entrepreneurship or the training of tomorrow's teachers: At the University of Münster, knowledge transfer to society is lived out in very different ways. The three examples have one thing in common – they convey university research.

Knowledge transfer at the University of Münster<address>© WWU - kn</address>
© WWU - kn

Knowledge transfer at the University of Münster

The creation of knowledge and its transfer to society is part of the public cultural heritage and therefore a central goal of the University of Münster. Whether museums, senior guest programme and children's university, support for start-ups, teacher education or science communication: The University of Münster understands knowledge transfer as an active exchange. In a dossier, support department communication and public relations examines the topic in all its many facets.

<address>© Kyle Glenn - Unsplash</address>
© Kyle Glenn - Unsplash

Humboldt Day: Hans-Christian Pape on international cooperation and exchanges

To mark the first Humboldt Day on 30 January at the University of Münster, Prof Hans-Christian Pape, president of the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation and researcher at Münster University, talks in this interview about international academic mobility, the University’s Research Alumni Strategy and the importance of the financial support provided by the Humboldt Foundation.

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