Center for German-American Educational History


The Center for German-American Educational History has been established in January 2014 at the Institut für Erziehungswissenschaft of the Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster. Thus, for the first time a German academic institution is dedicated entirely to the exploration of the conditions and processes of transatlantic educational history – from its beginnings in the 17th century up to today. The Center’s research and teaching is focused on the wide scope and special quality of the multifaceted interrelationships between German and American pedagogues, school founders and education-policy makers from the colonial period up to the 21st century.

The Center’s policy of information provision, teaching and research is based on the premise that the development of the different systems of education in Germany and America has been marked by fruitful competition as well as mutual interaction and interference since the Early Modern Period. Both educational systems profit from the knowledge of their entangled and intertwined history. The awareness of a common history sharpens the sense of the fact that there exists indeed a transatlantic community with shared values even with regard to ideals of education – in theory and practice.

Franz von Fürstenberg - the prime minister and founder of the University of Münster (1773) - was in contact with German emigrants in America.
Franz von Fürstenberg - the prime minister and founder of the University of Münster (1773) - was in contact with German emigrants in America.
© IfE


The current ideals of education both in the United States and in Germany are derived from and related to a set of key values propagated in the Age of Enlightenment: Self-responsibility and autonomy of the citizen, religious toleration, individual rights of freedom and a broad general education available to all people as a sign of their human dignity. These values were first formulated in the 18th century as the predominant goals of modern self-education and self-government. They can be traced back to the American Constitution of 1787/88 and they can be detected in the Grundgesetz of 1949, the German post-war Constitution that came into being with the support of United States officials. This is why the Center’s research and teaching has a particular but by no means exclusive emphasis on the early phase of German-American educational history in the Age of Enlightenment.


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Book of the Month - August 2018

1968 - Memories and Legacies of a Global Revolt

by Philipp Gassert and Martin Klimke
© GHI Washington DC

Protests and demonstrations, sometimes violent, swept the globe in 1968, from the Americas to Europe, Africa, and Asia. The introduction to this collection of essays notes: "...the rebellious young people of 1968 sincerely believed they were involved in a struggle against established orders (and world orders) worldwide." Herein one finds accounts of the anti-war left, the Prague Spring, and dozens of other protest movements.

Bulletin Supplement 6 (2009) of the German Historical Institute Washington, DC

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