Building the Multiscale Imaging Centre

Photos

November 2017: The basement on the north side of the Multiscale Imaging Centre has been given an especially thick concrete foundation.
© CiM/S. Marschalkowski
  • The reason is that a particle accelerator will be standing in the basement later which will be used to produce radioactive substances for nuclear medicine imaging. The concrete, two metres thick, will prevent any radiation from leaking into the soil below. Walls and ceilings will also be reinforced by means of barite concrete and lead plates.
    © CiM/S. Marschalkowski
  • On the south side the foundation is already being laid for the office area and the seminar rooms on the ground floor.
    © CiM/S. Marschalkowski
  • August 2017: The basement and the lift shaft have now been prepared, …
    © CiM - Friedemann Kiefer
  • … and the water and electricity mains for the building have been laid.
    © CiM - Manfred Thomas
  • July 2017: The foundation stone for the Multiscale Imaging Centre is laid! The coordinators at the Cells-in-Motion Cluster of Excellence are delighted, as are some of the group leaders who will be doing research in the new building, as well as the Deans of the Faculties involved.
    © WWU - Christina Heimken
  • A time capsule is filled with daily newspapers, coins and building plans by representatives of the Ministry of Science of North Rhine-Westphalia (NRW), the City of Münster, Münster University, the Construction and Real Estate Management Authority for NRW and the Gerber architectural practice …
    © WWU - Christina Heimken
  • … and is then deposited in the foundation walls of the new building.
    © WWU - Christina Heimken
  • The Multiscale Imaging Centre (MIC) is being built at the heart of the natural and life sciences campus of the Münster University in Röntgenstraße.
    © CiM
  • May 2017: Now it can really get going! Building permission has been granted and first stone laying is scheduled for 7 July 2017.
    © CiM - Sylwia Marschalkowski
  • The building site was first searched thoroughly for unexploded bombs from World War Two – luckily, none were found.
    © CiM - Sylwia Marschalkowski
  • The construction site sign has already been up for some while.
    © CiM - Sylwia Marschalkowski
  • February 2017: A touch of snow on the new building site
    © CiM - Doris Niederhoff
  • This is how the Multiscale Imaging Centre will look when it is finished. In an area of 5,700 m2 with state-of-the-art laboratories, approximately 260 staff members will undertake research together under one roof. The construction costs, around 63 million euros, will be covered by the federal government, the state of North Rhine-Westphalia and the Münster University.
    © Gerber Architekten

In the Multiscale Imaging Centre (MIC) that is scheduled to be completed in 2019, researchers will be bringing together a broad spectrum of biomedical imaging processes to be used in studying the behaviour of cells in organisms. The building gives a structural basis for the long-term establishment of the Cells-in-Motion Cluster of Excellence research concept at the university.

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Consolidator Grants for CiM Professors

© CiM/P. Grewer

Double success: two "Consolidator Grants" from the European Research Council (ERC) go to professors at the Cells-in-Motion Cluster of Excellence. Prof. Andrea Rentmeister, a chemist, and physicist Prof. Timo Betz each receive one of the coveted fundings – in total, almost four million euros.

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CiM/sr

Successful publications

© CiM - Peter Grewer

Two scientific publications by physicists at the Cells-in-Motion Cluster of Excellence have made it onto the 2017 list of the 30 best papers worldwide in the fields of optics and photonics. One of the publications resulted from an interdisciplinary project undertaken by junior CiM researchers.

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“Failure is not an option”

© EIMI/M. Kuhlmann

Prof. Friedemann Kiefer performs research at the Cells-in-Motion Cluster of Excellence, investigating how lymphatic vessels are formed and preserved. In his work, though, he constantly looks beyond the boundaries of his own field to develop new ideas. His overall aim is to make contributions of lasting value.

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CiM

Go-ahead for Collaborative Research Centre

© WWU - Peter Grewer

The German Research Foundation approved funding for the new Collaborative Research Centre 1348 „Dynamic Cellular Interfaces“. The positive assessment of this initiative which is headed by Prof. Christian Klämbt and involves many researchers at the Cells-in-Motion Cluster of Excellence gives additional momentum to the submission of a new proposal within the Excellence Strategy.

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CiM/sr

How do cells form blebs for their motility?

© M. Goudarzi et al./Dev. Cell

In order to be able to move, some cells form protrusions in the form of blebs. How do these blebs form? Researchers at the Cells-in-Motion Cluster of Excellence have discovered that folds in the cell membrane play a decisive role. The study has been published in the journal “Developmental Cell”.

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CiM/sr

Ten years of molecular imaging at EIMI

© EIMI/S. Marschalkowski

One part of the foundation of the Cells-in-Motion Cluster of Excellence celebrates its tenth anniversary: the European Institute for Molecular Imaging. How has the institute developed over the past ten years? What were special moments? In an interview, the EIMI Directors look back.