Building the Multiscale Imaging Centre

Photos

September 2018: Workers put the first windows into the façade of the Multiscale Imaging Centre.
© CiM / Foto: E. Wibberg

In the Multiscale Imaging Centre (MIC) that is scheduled to be completed in 2019, researchers will be bringing together a broad spectrum of biomedical imaging processes to be used in studying the behaviour of cells in organisms. The building gives a structural basis for the long-term establishment of the Cells-in-Motion Cluster of Excellence research concept at the university.

Grant worth millions for chemist

© privat

At the Cells-in-Motion Cluster of Excellence, Prof. Ryan Gilmour is developing new types of chemical reactions to provide molecules with fluorine atoms. This plays a role for example in the development of drugs. He has now been awarded a coveted Consolidator Grant from the European Research Council.

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How cells generate forces

© A. Singh et al./ Nature Cell Biology

Researchers at the Cells-in-Motion Cluster of Excellence show that microtubules, which are tubular filaments that form part of the cytoskeleton, generate mechanical forces und contribute to collective cell behaviour during tissue morphogenesis. The study has been published in “Nature Cell Biology”.

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Looking at the mechanisms of translation

© S. Rode & S. Rumpf

Proteins are produced in the cell in a process known as “translation”. Researchers at the Cells-in-Motion Cluster of Excellence show how nerve cells regulate the production of specific proteins during the development of the nervous system. The study has been published in the journal “Cell Reports”.

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New “Gerty Cori” junior research groups

© CiM / Foto: E. Wibberg

Dr. Noelia Alonso Gonzalez and Dr. Maria Bohnert have started working as junior research group leaders at the Cells-in-Motion Cluster of Excellence. Funding for their work is being provided by a new programme designed by the Cluster to support outstanding female researchers in leading positions.

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Signals that guide cells through the body

© D. Malhotra et al./eLife

Cells produce signalling molecules, the Chemokines, which can control the behaviour of other cells. For this purpose they bind to a protein, the chemokine receptor. Each receptor can trigger different responses. Researchers at the Cells-in-Motion Cluster of Excellence have discovered a mechanism behind this.

Research on the plasma membrane

© AG Wedlich-Söldner

Internal award: Researchers headed by CiM Prof. Roland Wedlich-Söldner have won the "Paper of the Month" awarded by the Faculty of Medicine at Münster University. The study “Lateral plasma membrane compartmentalization links protein function and turnover” has been published in July in Embo Journal.