Building the Multiscale Imaging Centre

Photos

The construction site sign has already been up for some while.
© CiM - Sylwia Marschalkowski
  • May 2017: Now it can really get going! Building permission has been granted and first stone laying is scheduled for 7 July 2017.
    © CiM - Sylwia Marschalkowski
  • The building site was first searched thoroughly for unexploded bombs from World War Two – luckily, none were found.
    © CiM - Sylwia Marschalkowski
  • February 2017: A touch of snow on the new building site
    © CiM - Doris Niederhoff
  • This is how the Multiscale Imaging Centre will look when it is finished. In an area of 5,700 m2 with state-of-the-art laboratories, approximately 260 staff members will undertake research together under one roof. The construction costs, around 63 million euros, will be covered by the federal government, the state of North Rhine-Westphalia and the Münster University.
    © Gerber Architekten

The new Multiscale Imaging Centre (MIC) is currently being built in Münster University’s Natural Science Centre in Röntgenstraße. From 2019, researchers will be bringing together here a broad spectrum of biomedical imaging processes to be used in studying the behaviour of cells in organisms. The building gives a structural basis for the long-term establishment of the Cells-in-Motion Cluster of Excellence research concept at the university.

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CiM/sr

"The way bones heal is fascinating"

© CiM - Sylwia Marschalkowski

Trauma surgeon Prof. Richard Stange investigates how bones heal. As the new Professor of Translational Regenerative Medicine at the Cells-in-Motion Cluster of Excellence, he combines basic research with clinical work. His aim is that research results should always benefit the patient as far as possible.

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MPI

Malpighi Award for Ralf Adams

© MPI Münster

The European Society of Microcirculation has granted its most prestigious award to Prof. Ralf Adams, a group leader at the Cells-in-Motion Cluster of Excellence. He investigates the development of the vascular system and stands out by high-ranking publications and scientific contribution in this field.

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CiM/sr

How does the nervous system develop?

© Svende Herzmann et al./Embo Journal

During development, some of the connections between nerve cells disappear. Researchers at the Cells-in-Motion Cluster of Excellence have discovered a physiological process that plays an important role in this. The study has been published in the current issue of “Embo Journal”.

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CiM/sr

Genetic defect causes vessel malformations

© MPI Münster/Wade Sugden

What role does the correct size of endothelial cells play in the development of blood vessels? Researchers at the Cells-in-Motion Cluster of Excellence have been studying this and have identified a gene which enlarges endothelial cells and can lead to diseases. The study has been published in “Nature Cell Biology”.

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CiM/sis

50,000 euros for junior researchers

© CiM - Jean-Marie Tronquet

Usually, interdisciplinary research is especially innovative. This is why the Cells-in-Motion Cluster of Excellence is funding five new pilot projects. Young researchers from several different disciplines have to apply for and implement the projects, for which they are themselves responsible.

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CiM/sr

FameLab: Olga Sin wins German finale

© Bielefeld Marketing - Sarah Jonek

In just three minutes at the end of April in Bielefeld, Dr. Olga Sin explained her protein research – and won over her audience. Olga Sin, a member of the Young Academy at the Cells-in-Motion Cluster of Excellence won the German final of the FameLab science competition.