Building the Multiscale Imaging Centre

Photos

June 2019: The outside façade of the Multiscale Imaging Centre is almost completely clinkered now. This is a view of the west face, looking from the south-west ...
© WWU/Erk Wibberg
  • … and from the north-west.
    © WWU/Erk Wibberg
  • January 2019: Having built a laboratory prototype, the planning team is finalizing the last details concerning the equipment to be installed in the labs. Of particular importance are functionality and safety issues.
    © WWU / Foto: E. Wibberg
  • As to the lab’s appearance, the floor covering will be anthracite, and a glass front will separate the documentation zone with PC work stations (foreground) from the lab area.
    © WWU / Foto: E. Wibberg
  • The building’s exterior has also changed its appearance further. The photo shows a view from Röntgenstraße, on which the main entrance will be located (view from the south-west).
    © WWU / Foto: E. Wibberg
  • The building’s façade will have the clinker brick design typical of the Münsterland region (view of Röntgenstraße from the south-east).
    © WWU / Foto: E. Wibberg
  • September 2018: Workers put the first windows into the façade of the Multiscale Imaging Centre.
    © CiM / Foto: E. Wibberg
  • Construction work in one of the atriums inside the building
    © CiM / Foto: E. Wibberg
  • This atrium, open to the sky, lets in the daylight for the adjacent rooms.
    © CiM / Foto: E. Wibberg
  • A further atrium will be covered with a glass roof later.
    © CiM / Foto: E. Wibberg
  • A view from the second floor, showing the two atriums on the right and the left
    © CiM / Foto: E. Wibberg
  • The future laboratory area
    © CiM / Foto: E. Wibberg
  • The auditorium, in which lectures will be given and symposiums held
    © CiM / Foto: E. Wibberg
  • June 2018: a bird's eye view of the building site
    © Gerber Architekten
  • April 2018: With the addition of a second crane, the shell construction is growing upwards fast. The workers on the site are currently completing the first storey. Three more are to follow.
    © CiM/S. Marschalkowski
  • The atrium in the interior of the building takes shape. At the moment it provides space for the base of the second crane.
    © CiM/S. Marschalkowski
  • The building workers use prefabricated components to make the formwork for the many shafts for technical equipment and lifts.
    © CiM/S. Marschalkowski
  • The shell construction of the auditorium has already been completed. In future, it will have space for almost 200 people.
    © CiM/S. Marschalkowski
  • February 2018: The basement on the west side is finished. The precision mechanics workshop will be in these rooms later.
    © CiM/S. Marschalkowski
  • The ground floor is also taking shape. There, the construction workers are currently building a stable floor slab.
    © CiM/S. Marschalkowski
  • Many steel struts increase the tensile strength of the concrete and thus stabilize the building. The free space in the middle will form the atrium.
    © CiM/S. Marschalkowski
  • In the meantime, two cranes have also started operation.
    © CiM/S. Marschalkowski
  • November 2017: The basement on the north side of the Multiscale Imaging Centre has been given an especially thick concrete foundation.
    © CiM/S. Marschalkowski
  • The reason is that a particle accelerator will be standing in the basement later which will be used to produce radioactive substances for nuclear medicine imaging. The concrete, two metres thick, will prevent any radiation from leaking into the soil below. Walls and ceilings will also be reinforced by means of barite concrete and lead plates.
    © CiM/S. Marschalkowski
  • On the south side the foundation is already being laid for the office area and the seminar rooms on the ground floor.
    © CiM/S. Marschalkowski
  • August 2017: The basement and the lift shaft have now been prepared, …
    © CiM - Friedemann Kiefer
  • … and the water and electricity mains for the building have been laid.
    © CiM - Manfred Thomas
  • July 2017: The foundation stone for the Multiscale Imaging Centre is laid! The coordinators at the Cells-in-Motion Cluster of Excellence are delighted, as are some of the group leaders who will be doing research in the new building, as well as the Deans of the Faculties involved.
    © WWU - Christina Heimken
  • A time capsule is filled with daily newspapers, coins and building plans by representatives of the Ministry of Science of North Rhine-Westphalia (NRW), the City of Münster, Münster University, the Construction and Real Estate Management Authority for NRW and the Gerber architectural practice …
    © WWU - Christina Heimken
  • … and is then deposited in the foundation walls of the new building.
    © WWU - Christina Heimken
  • The Multiscale Imaging Centre (MIC) is being built at the heart of the natural and life sciences campus of the Münster University in Röntgenstraße.
    © CiM
  • May 2017: Now it can really get going! Building permission has been granted and first stone laying is scheduled for 7 July 2017.
    © CiM - Sylwia Marschalkowski
  • The building site was first searched thoroughly for unexploded bombs from World War Two – luckily, none were found.
    © CiM - Sylwia Marschalkowski
  • The construction site sign has already been up for some while.
    © CiM - Sylwia Marschalkowski
  • February 2017: A touch of snow on the new building site
    © CiM - Doris Niederhoff
  • This is how the Multiscale Imaging Centre will look when it is finished. In an area of 5,700 m2 with state-of-the-art laboratories, approximately 260 staff members will undertake research together under one roof. The construction costs, around 63 million euros, will be covered by the federal government, the state of North Rhine-Westphalia and the Münster University.
    © Gerber Architekten

In the Multiscale Imaging Centre (MIC) that is currently under construction, researchers will be bringing together a broad spectrum of biomedical imaging processes to be used in studying the behaviour of cells in organisms. The building gives a structural basis for the long-term establishment of the Cells-in-Motion Cluster of Excellence research concept at the university.

CiM
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Cell communication in the “fear network”

© WWU/Erk Wibberg

Biologist Dr. Lena Goedecke investigates how nerve cells in the brain communicate with each other and regulate anxiety reactions. In a guest article, she gives insights into her doctoral thesis, which she did at the graduate school of the Cells-in-Motion Cluster of Excellence.

CiM/dn
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A trigger for motion persistence

© Isabell Begemann, Milos Galic

Researchers at the Cells-in-Motion Cluster of Excellence have discovered that curvatures of cell membranes trigger a self-organising system. As a result, cells can move in the same direction over a longer distance, forming search patterns. The study has been published in the journal “Nature Physics”.

CiM
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“My lab is in my mind”

© WWU/T. Hauss

Mathematician Prof. Angela Stevens from the Cells-in-Motion Cluster of Excellence understands mathematics and biology as equal partners. She contributes to the explanation and prediction of biological phenomena with the aid of mathematics. One example is the role of cell motility in developmental processes.

upm
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Interdisciplinary exchange at lunchtime

© WWU/K. Nolte

The Cells-in-Motion Brown-Bag Lunch encourages junior researchers from different scientific disciplines to exchange ideas in an informal atmosphere. The University of Münster is presenting this scientific lunchtime meeting in a current article about interdisciplinary culture among junior researchers.

CiM
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Moving cells – dynamic research

© WWU/P. Grewer

Dynamic plays a central role in the research of the three Clusters of Excellence at the University of Münster. Prof. Lydia Sorokin, spokesperson of "Cells in Motion", as well as the representatives of the other two Clusters of Excellence explain how they understand and use "dynamics" in their research.

WiS
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"Sharing scientific discoveries is important"

© WiS

Immunologist Ana-Maria Lennon-Duménil from Paris has recently held a lecture at the Cells-in-Motion Cluster of Excellence. PhD students from the “Women in Science” network at the Cluster have talked to her about the importance of sharing, the unstable state as a scientist and the question of how to deal with gender bias.