Janina Rinke

PhD Student

 

© Janina Rinke

Molecular Evolution and Sociobiology
Institute for Evolution and Biodiversity
University of Münster
Hüfferstr. 1
48149 Münster, Germany
Phone: +49 251/83-210921
janina.rinke@uni-muenster.de
Nationality: German De

Education

  • Since 2022:
    PhD in the Molecular Evolution and Sociobiology Group, Institute for Evolution and Biodiversity, University of Münster, Germany
  • 2021:
    Visiting student at the University Copenhagen, Denmark
  • 2019 - 2022:
    Master of Science (M.Sc.) in Biosciences, University of Münster, Germany
    Maste thesis: "Horizontal gene transfer in ants"
  • 2018 - 2019:
    Study abroad at University of Sheffield, United Kingdom
  • 2016 - 2019:
    Bachelor of Science (B.Sc.) in Biosciences, University of Münster, Germany
    Bachelor thesis: "Proximate and ultimate mechanisms of worker policing in Camponotus maculatus"

Work Experience

  • 2021 - 2022
    Student Assistant, University of Münster, Germany
  • 2021 - 2022
    Volunteer at MS.for.DKMS Initiative Münster, Germany

Supervisors

  • Prof. Dr. Jürgen Gadau, Molecular Evolution and Sociobiology Group, Institute for Evolution and Biodiversity, University of Münster
  • Dr. Lukas Schrader, Molecular Evolution and Sociobiology Group, Institute for Evolution and Biodiversity, University of Münster
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Research interests

  • Genetic basis of social insect evolution

  • Comparative genomics

  • Horizontal gene transfer

  • Adaptive evolution

PhD project description

The evolution of genome compartmentalization in the ant genus Cardiocondyla

I am working with different species of the ant Cardiocondyla to investigate the evolution of transposable elements in these ants. My main research goal is to get an idea how transposable elements might have influenced the genome evolution of this genus and evolution of these ants in general.

Interestingly, the genome of the ant C. obscurior – of which we have a high-quality genome assembly – is highly compartmentalized into slowly evolving TE-poor regions and fast-evolving TE-rich regions. By using comparative genomic, population genomic and transcriptomic studies, I am hoping to shed light on this phenomenon in Cardiocondyla spp and aim to unravel its effects on the species’ ability to adapt to changing environmental conditions.