© Bill Crawford

Prof. Dr. David De Vleeschouwer

Institute of Geology and Paleontology
Earth System Science
University of Münster
Corrensstr. 24
D-48149 Münster
Germany

ddevlees@uni-muenster.de

 

 

  • Curriculum Vitae

    since 01.2022

    Juniorprofessor for Earth System Science / Erdsystemforschung. W1-to-W3 tenure-track in 6 years. Institute for Geology and Palaeontology, University of Münster.

    2019-2021

    Senior Scientist: “Cluster of Excellence – The Ocean Floor – Earth’s Uncharted Interface”. Deriving scenarios for “warmer worlds” through comprehensive decoding of environmental signals from past warm climate conditions as recorded in ocean-floor archives. Center for Marine Environmental Sciences (MARUM), Bremen.

    2020

    Ame­ri­can Geo­phy­si­cal Uni­on (AGU) Nanne Weber Early Career Award in Pa­leo­cli­ma­to­lo­gy & Pa­leo­cea­no­gra­phy. 

    2014-2019

    Postdoc in “ERC Consolidator Grant EARTHSEQUENCING” to Prof. Pälike. Center for Marine Environmental Sciences (MARUM), Bremen.

    2016

    Eu­ro­pean Geo­sci­en­ces Uni­on (EGU) Out­stan­ding Young Sci­en­tist Award in the di­vi­si­on of Stratigraphy, Sedimentology and Palaeontology (SSP).

    08.-09.2015

    Physical Properties and Downhole Logging specialist on IODP Expedition 356 “Indonesian Throughflow”.

    08.-12.2013

    Visiting Scholar. Extended stay with Prof. Dr. James E. Day. Illinois State University, Normal, Illinois, United States.

    2010-2014

    PhD in Geology, "The influence of orbital forcing on the Devonian (370 Ma) extreme greenhouse climate.” Advisors: Prof. Dr. Ph. Claeys, Dr. M. Crucifix. Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Belgium.

    2008-2010

    Master of Science in Geography – Earth and climate. Magna cum laude. Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Belgium and Katholieke Universiteit Leuven.

    2005-2008

    Bachelor of Science in Geography. Magna cum laude. Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Belgium.

     

  • Research Interests

    As a pa­leo­cea­no­gra­pher, un­ra­ve­ling en­vi­ron­men­tal pro­xy si­gnals from past warm climate con­di­ti­ons as recorded in marine sediments is my bre­ad & but­ter. 

    Three "warmer-than-present" Epochs of in­te­rest:

    • Pliocene (transition from uni-polar to bi-polar ice sheets)
    • Eocene (transition from ice-free conditions to isolated uni-polar ice caps)
    • Late Devonian (ice-free greenhouse climate state). 

    My re­se­arch fo­cus lies on climate - carbon cycle feedback mechanisms (and their chan­ging re­s­pon­se to as­tro­no­mi­cal for­cing) under non-Quaternary boundary conditions. For ex­amp­le, on a pla­net with uni­po­lar ice-sheets, on a pla­net wi­thout 8000 m high Hi­ma­la­y­an moun­ta­ins, on a pla­net with a wide-open In­do­ne­si­an Through­flow, or on a pla­net with more than 500 ppm CO2. To do so, I stu­dy se­veral geo­lo­gi­cal epochs: the Late De­vo­ni­an (~375 Ma), the Eo­ce­ne (~40 Ma) and the Plio­ce­ne (~5 Ma). None of the­se time sli­ces are per­fect ana­lo­gues for the An­thro­po­ce­ne, yet they are worth stu­dy­ing as they pro­vi­de va­luable in­sights into the ma­chine­ry of the cli­ma­te sys­tem un­der boun­da­ry con­di­ti­ons much un­li­ke to­day’s. Ob­vious­ly, the age of the se­di­ment(ary rock) un­der in­ves­ti­ga­ti­on is very dif­fe­rent bet­ween the three epochs of in­te­rest, but my work al­ways sha­res a com­mon ob­jec­tive: Integrating the paleoclimate and geochronology aspects of the sedimentary archives to better constrain how much and how fast our planet has been changing. To do so, I draw from my broad skill set (field, lab and nu­me­ri­cal mo­de­ling) and from a wide ran­ge of pro­xies (iso­to­pic, ele­men­tal and geo­phy­si­cal pro­xies). 

  • Peer-Reviewed Publications

    Peer-reviewed publications