Research Project

Auditory Reafferences in movement control? Behavioral and neurophysiological effects of compensation during interferences and deprivation

Auditory reafferences (AR) are the audible effects of our own movements and are – as auditory feedback – relevant for action observation and movement control. Those auditory reafferences that are the goal of an action (ARG), e.g. language or music, interfere with the action if manipulated (e.g. temporal delay) or absent. While we do not know a lot about AR that are a mere by-product of an action (ARB), they are still omnipresent in our everyday-life (e.g. tool use, object actions, sounds of our feet while walking). Although those sounds are not the goal of our actions, their absence would clearly surprise us. Are auditory reafferences that do not seem to be a part of the action goal in the proper sense relevant for movement control? Are there principal or partial differences in the psychophysiological processing of ARB and ARG?
The aim of our work is to broaden the theoretical concept of auditory reafferences by comparing the effects of deprivation and interference on these two classes of movement, using both behavioral measures and fMRI.

PhD Committee

Prof. Dr. Ricarda Schubotz
Prof. Dr. Dr. Markus Raab
Prof. Dr. Pienie Zwitserlood

Publications

Heins, N., Pomp, J., Kluger, D. S., Trempler, I., Zentgraf, K., Raab, M., & Schubotz, R. I. (2020). Incidental or Intentional? Different Brain Responses to One's Own Action Sounds in Hurdling vs. Tap Dancing. Frontiers in Neuroscience, 14, 483.

Friedrich, P., Ocklenburg, S., Heins, N., Schlüter, C., Fraenz, C., Beste, C., ... & Genç, E. (2017). Callosal microstructure affects the timing of electrophysiological left-right differences. NeuroImage

CV

*1992 Düsseldorf, Germany
2011–2014 Bachelor of Science in Psychology at the University of Düsseldorf, Germany
2014-2016 Master of Science in Psychology and Cognitive Neuroscience at the Ruhr-University Bochum, Germany
Since 2016 PhD student at the Institute of Psychology, University of Münster, Germany