News & Views

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© Liu et al./Nat Comm 2021

First synthetic tissue model in which blood vessels can grow

A research team headed by biomedical engineer Dr Britta Trappmann has developed a cell culture system in which, for the first time, a functional blood vessel system is able to grow within a framework made of synthetic material. The team investigates which material properties promote individual parameters of vessel formation – a step towards the futuristic vision of implantable artificial tissues. The study was published in “Nature Communications”.

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© WWU/Laura Grahn

Honour for chemist from the University of Münster

The "Royal Society of Chemistry" has elected Prof. Andrea Rentmeister as a Fellow. It thus honours the chemist's achievements in the field of biomolecular labelling chemistry. "I am delighted about this international recognition and, in addition to visibility, I am looking forward to new networking opportunities, especially with British researchers," Andrea Rentmeister emphasises.

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© WWU/Michael Kuhlmann

First graduate of the Study Programme “Experimental Medicine”

Stefanie Bobe wants to dive deeper into medicine looking at the biomedical basis for improved diagnostic and therapeutic options. Therefore, she did an additional, science-oriented Master's degree in experimental medicine parallel to her medical studies and, in the working group led by biochemist Prof Friedemann Kiefer, became part of an interdisciplinary research team.

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© Rossaint et al./JExpMed 2021

How platelets help resolve lung inflammation

Scientists working with Prof Jan Rossaint and Prof Alexander Zarbock, two anesthesiologists and intensive care specialists at the University of Münster, have found how platelets interacting with white blood cells contribute to the resolution of bacterial lung inflammation in mice. The results may help in the search for therapies to specifically regulate inflammation. The study was published in the "Journal of Experimental Medicine".

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© WWU/Erk Wibberg

Artwork installed in the Multiscale Imaging Centre

A twelve-meter high wall installation was recently assembled in the gradually emerging Multiscale Imaging Centre. The work, by artist Cordula Hesselbarth, is entitled “Auf|Lösung” (Re|Solution) and embodies the research that scientists will be undertaking in the building on Röntgenstraße in Münster. Have a look at our latest photos and info!

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© Isasti-Sanchez et al./Dev Cell 2021

Junctions between three cells serve as gateways for the transport of substances

A team headed by developmental biologist Prof Dr Stefan Luschnig from the University of Münster has discovered that during egg development in fruit flies, intercellular gaps open between epithelial cells in a controlled way at the points where three cells meet. This process allows yolk proteins to be transported into the egg cell. The study has been published in the journal “Developmental Cell”.

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© Köhler Photographie

Ryan Gilmour elected to the Royal Society of Edinburgh

Prof. Dr. Ryan Gilmour from the Institute of Organic Chemistry at Münster University has been elected to the Royal Society of Edinburgh (RSE), Scotland's national academy of science and letters. As one of seven personalities eleceted as corresponding fellows, the chemist joins the ranks of distinguished Fellows resident abroad.

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© Victoria Liesche

Interview and talk: mathematics and medical imaging

In an interview, mathematician Prof Benedikt Wirth gives insights into mathematical concepts that are fundamental for medical imaging and describes specific research projects in which he works together with colleagues from the fields of biology, medicine, physics and other disciplines. In an online talk on March 24, he will then be presenting (in German) mathematical findings which were necessary for the development of technologies.

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© Lisa Fischer, Carsten Grashoff

New microscopy analysis allows discovery of central adhesion complex

Researchers around cell biologist Prof Dr Carsten Grashoff from the University of Münster and at the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry have developed a method for determining the arrangement and density of individual proteins in cells. In this way, they were able to prove the existence of an adhesion complex consisting of three proteins.

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© Tronquet / Kleinrensing/Messerschmidt/Schmidtchen

Funding for “Topical Programs”

Two initiatives on topics in the research area of the Cells in Motion Interfaculty Centre have received funding from the Rectorate of the University of Münster: Microbiologist Prof Dr Ulrich Dobrindt and cell biologist Prof Dr Ursula Rescher are addressing questions of host-microbe interaction. Mathematician Prof Dr Angela Stevens and cell biologist Prof Dr Erez Raz want to conceptually deepen the interplay between experimental biology and mathematics.

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© Gross-Thebing, Truszkowski, Tenbrinck et al. Sci Adv 2020;6: eabc5546/CC BY-NC

Patterns in primordial germ cell migration

Biologists and mathematicians at the Universities of Münster and Erlangen-Nürnberg investigated how primordial germ cells behave in zebrafish embryos when not influenced by a guidance cue and developed software that merges 3D microscopy images of multiple organisms. This made it possible to recognise patterns in the cell distribution and thus to highlight tissues that influence cell migration. The study was published in “Science Advances”.

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© AG Pernice

Light-carrying chips advance machine learning

Working together with an international team, researchers around nanophysicist Prof Dr Wolfram Pernice at Münster University found that photonic processors, with which data is processed by means of light, can process information very much more rapidly and in parallel than electronic chips. The results published in "Nature" could be applied to support the evaluation of large quantities of data produced in biomedical imaging.