Speakers

  • Prof. Thomas D. Pollard’s research focuses on understanding cell motility through the study of actin filaments and myosin motors. His lab uses a combination of biochemistry, biophysics, microscopy and fission yeast genetics to investigate the molecular basis of cellular motility and cytokinesis.
  • Dr. Nicolas Rivron’s lab is seeking to understand the general principles underlying the organization of stem cells in the early developmental phase of organisms. To study these principles, they use model organisms (Blastoids) that were created by harnessing the intrinsic potential of stem cells to self-organize which allows to systematically modulate and analyse their behavior. Their main focus is to generate more such embryo models for drug and genetic screens, biochemistry and genomic analysis.
  • Prof. Robert Grosse investigates the role of cytoskeletal proteins such as formin in cell motility, tumor progression and metastasis. His lab is also interested in discovering how actin network formation and organization drives cellular behaviors, such as polarization, invasion, mitotic spindle formation, chromosome congression and the effect of intracellular signaling on cellular morphology and dynamics.
  • Prof. Sylvia Erhardt’s research focuses on understanding the epigenetic mechanisms specifying centromere identity and aims to elucidate how these mechanisms are linked to chromosome segregation and cell cycle progression.
  • Prof. Lena Claesson-Welsh’s research focus lies in the molecular mechanisms of endothelial cell biology, particularly angiogenesis and its link to cancer metastasis, VEGF signal transduction, vessel permeability and tissue homeostasis.
  • Prof. Lene B Oddershede’s lab investigates physical properties of biological systems at levels ranging from the single molecule to the whole cell with a particular interest in stem cells. Her lab uses single particle tracking, fluorescence, sub-diffraction techniques and their state-of-the-art force-scope optical tweezers to study nanoparticle plasmonics.
  • Dr. Alex Bird’s group investigates the function and regulation of microtubule networks in context to mitosis, migration and neuritogenesis. One of the major aims of his research is to uncover the regulatory mechanisms and pathways that guide the formation function of the mitotic spindle to ensure genome stability.
  • Prof. René Medema studies the molecular mechanisms of cell division. His lab works on understanding cell recovery from DNA damage and aims to use this knowledge in designing efficient anti-cancer drugs. They are also interested in studying the role of establishment of the correct balance of forces during bipolar spindle assembly, which is required to segregate chromosomes during cell division.
  • Prof. Christopher Chen is interested in cellular interactions, especially the cooperation between mechanical and biochemical signaling in the regulation of angiogenesis and stem cell biology. His lab studies tissue vascularization, connective tissues and cancer using micro- and nanofabrication tools.
  • Prof. Cécile Sykes studies Biomimetism of cell movement and approaches the biological problems using the principles of soft matter physics. Her team focuses mainly on the underlying mechanisms of cell division and motility that would expand the knowledge about cancer invasion and metastasis. With a combination of in-vitro biomimetic systems and in-vivo cellular and animal models ranging from nematode worms to mouse oocytes, her research provides answers to many physical and biochemical mechanisms governing cell shape change and movement.
  • Having developed the unique intravital CLEM (Correlative Light and Electron Microscopy) technology, Dr. Jacky Goetz’s lab tracks intravascular tumor metastasis and are keen on understanding the molecular and cellular mechanisms driving metastasis formation. They are also examining the role of mechanical forces in tumor invasion and the fate and function of tumor exosomes on local and distant microenvironment during the priming of metastatic niches.
  • The primary focus of Prof. Uri Manor is the integration and application of optical and charged particle detection technologies to investigate problems of critical biological significance. He is focused on developing deep learning-based computational approaches to increase the resolution, sensitivity and speed of next generation microscopes, as well as designing nanoprobes for high spatiotemporal resolution imaging of subcellular dynamics. His main biological interests are organelle-organelle contacts, cytoskeletal dynamics, mitochondria, sensorineural hearing loss and neurodegeneration.
  • Prof. Stephen Mann is the founder of biomimetic chemistry and is distinguished for his contributions to biomineralization, bioinspired materials chemistry, self-assembly of functional nanostructures and hybrid nanoscale objects. His current research focus includes, the chemical synthesis, characterization and emergence of complex organized matter, including models of protocell assembly.
  • Prof. Seraphine Wegner is interested in light-controlled systems, especially the spatiotemporal control of cell-material and cell-cell interactions and associated processes in natural and synthetic minimal cells by using visible light. Her lab focuses on addressing questions in cell biology to better engineer new synthetic minimal cells, which reduces the complexity despite retaining the key features of a cell, allowing to quantify and correlate cell behavior with their molecular information.
  • Dr. Helena Azevedo engineers molecules for biomedical application. She uses supramolecular chemistry to program macromolecules to self-assemble into biologically active structures to understand the energy pathways required for this self-assembly.
  • Prof. Debora Marks and her lab develop computational methods for interpreting genetic variation with a focus on biomedical applications. To this end they have developed tools to predict 3D structures of RNAs, RNA-protein complexes and proteins from genomic sequence data. The current focus of her lab lies in developing methods in deep learning to address a wide range of biological challenges including the prediction of the effects of genetic variation and sequence design for biosynthetic applications.
  • The research focus of Prof. Fabian Theis’s lab includes using computational methods for analyzing and modelling single cell heterogeneities with a focus on machine learning approaches and predictive algorithms applied to biological and biomedical questions. This includes the development of tools for scRNA-Seq Analysis, predicting perturbation effects in scRNA-Seq data and analysing and interpreting RNA Velocity.
  • Prof. Angela Stevens is particularly interested in mathematical modelling in biology and medicine, where she analyses developmental processes and cell motility. Her work combines rigorous mathematical research with challenging problems in the life sciences.