Overview

Research Projects

Workplace health

Evaluation of an individualized compensatory exercise intervention for university employees with high levels of sedentary behaviour

Evaluation of an individualized compensatory exercise intervention for university employees with high levels of sedentary behaviour
© Carsten Müller

Carsten Müller, Karen Zentgraf
Objectives:
To evaluate an individualized physical exercise intervention program for university (WWU) employees focusing on the reduction of strength and mobility asymmetries of the trunk, particularly of the cervical spine, to analyze psychophysical well-being and pain perception over the course of the eight month intervention period, and to compare the effects of this individualized exercise program to common fitness/exercise recommendations - a prospective wait list control trial.

Methods: Exercise Intervention, Stress, Pain, Cervical Spine, Health Promotion, Subjective Well-being, Strength, Articular Range of Motion, Trunk muscle endurance test, Trierer Inventar zum Chronischen Stress (TICS), Trunk Stability Push-up, Functional Movement Screen (FMS), workplace health, Qick Dash, Shoulder Mobility

Date: 27 March 2017 - 31 December 2017

Decreasing head accelerations

Evaluation of a neuromuscular exercise intervention to decrease head accelerations following (un-)anticipated (in-)direct impacts in sports games

Evaluation of a neuromuscular exercise intervention to decrease head accelerations following (un-)anticipated (in-)direct impacts in sports games
© Carsten Müller

Carsten Müller, Karen Zentgraf
Goal: Taking into account gender and age, the objectives of this project are...
1) to analyze head accelerations following anticipated (in-)direct impacts in youth sports games (heading in football, jump throw in handball); to examine the association of head accelerations and maximal isometric strength of the cervical musculature; and to evaluate their impact on cognitive performance and postural control.
2) to evaluate a progressive neuromuscular exercise intervention focusing on the cervical musculature with regard to performance changes in the maximal isometric strength as well as the electromyographically acquired latencies under perturbation conditions (unanticipated);
3) to evaluate intervention effects on the kinematic, cognitive and posturographic variables following anticipated (in-)direct impacts (heading in football, jump throw in handball).

Funding:
Bundesinstitut für Sportwissenschaft (BISp)
http://www.bisp.de/DE/Home/home_node.html

Methods: Exercise Intervention, Surface Electromyography, Cognitive Test, Postural Control, Accelerometry, Muscle Strength, Handball, Football

Date: 1 February 2017 - 31 January 2019

Joint Action

Vision adds to haptics when dyads perform a whole-body joint balance task

© Leonie Sieverding

When two or more people aim to produce joint action outcomes they need to coordinate their individual actions in space and time. Successful joint action performance has been reported to depend, among others, on visual and somatosensory information provided to the joint actors.
This study investigated whether and how the systematic manipulation of visual information modulates real-time joint action when dyads performed a whole-body joint balance task. To this end, we introduced the Joint Action Board (JAB) where partners guided a ball through a maze towards a virtual hole by jointly shifting their weight on the board under three visual conditions:
(1) the Follower had neither visual access to the Leader nor to the maze;
(2) the Follower had no visual access to the maze but to the Leader;
(3) the Follower had full visual access to both the Leader and to the maze.
Joint action performance was measured as completion time of the maze task; interpersonal coordination was examined by means of kinematic analyses of both partners’ motor behaviour.
We predicted that systematically adding visual to the available haptic information would result in a significant increase in joint performance and that Leaders would change their coordination behavior depending on these conditions.
Results showed that adding visual information to haptics led to an increase in joint action performance in a Leader–Follower relationship in a joint balance task. In addition, interpersonal coordination behavior (i.e. sway range of motion, time-lag between partner’s bodies etc.) changed dependent on the provided visual information between partners in the jointly executed task.
Find this article in Experimental Brain Research