© WDR

Open lab day for families

For almost 45 years, the children’s TV show ”Die Sendung mit der Maus” has been making science fun. Every year, on October 3rd, the show promotes a nationwide open day. Several CiM labs take part in this event.

Photos

Around a hundred children wanted to know what researchers do in their labs. Researchers from the Cells-in-Motion Cluster of Excellence were on hand to explain things to the young visitors at a total of six institutes.
© CiM/Jürgen Christ
  • In many labs, microscopes are part of the basic equipment. The “junior researchers” were able to take a look for themselves at a variety of cells.
    © CiM/Jürgen Christ
  • How do light microscopes work? The basics can be easily understood if you can bundle and disperse varicoloured lasers yourself.
    © CiM/Jürgen Christ
  • Where do the cells come from that scientists do their research on? How do cells actually live in labs? And what do they eat? In the lab, biology lessons are suddenly much more interesting.
    © CiM/Jürgen Christ
  • You can produce wonderful pictures with yeast. However, “tomorrow’s researchers” have to wait a bit before they can see their paintings in petri dishes – first the yeast culture has to grow.
    © CiM/Jürgen Christ
  • Humans and bananas share about half of their DNA. “Tomorrow’s researchers” were able to isolate banana DNA for themselves, using washing-up liquid, salt, tea filters and skewers.
    © CiM/Jürgen Christ
  • Anyone doing research on viruses needs proper protective clothing. The visitors were also able to test …
    © CiM/Jürgen Christ
  • … what a day working as a virus researcher feels like.
    © CiM/Jürgen Christ
  • Viruses spread fast when people shake hands. Just how fast, is demonstrated by an experiment using fluorescent cream.
    © CiM/Jürgen Christ
  • Biology can be a lot of fun when scientists explain their research topics in an easy-to-understand way.
    © CiM/Jürgen Christ
  • Vaccinations are like protective shields for humans, protecting us against attacks by viruses – symbolized here by balls.
    © CiM/Jürgen Christ
  • A look at the life of a research fish. There are about 40,000 zebrafish swimming around in the aquariums of the Institute for Cell Biology.
    © CiM/Jürgen Christ
  • The “junior researchers” were fascinated and at many places they were able to undertake their own “research”.
    © CiM/Jürgen Christ

Look back 2017

Nearly one hundred "researchers of tomorrow" and their parents came to the labs of the Cells-in-Motion Cluster of Excellence for the "Türöffner-Tag". They fed cells, wore protective clothing and isolated the DNA of bananas.

Photos

DNA made tangible: a paper model showed “junior researchers” the structure of DNA.
© CiM - Wilfried Hiegemann
  • At the Institute of Physiological Chemistry and Pathobiochemistry the young researchers extracted DNA from puréed banana.
    © CiM - Wilfried Hiegemann
  • What happens in the autoimmune disease multiple sclerosis? CiM scientists explained it to children using crocheted cells.
    © CiM - Wilfried Hiegemann
  • Astonishment at the results of experiments – that’s how fascinating research can be.
    © CiM - Wilfried Hiegemann
  • No visit to a laboratory is complete without looking through a microscope.
    © CiM - Wilfried Hiegemann
  • How much light is absorbed by a chemical element? Participants were able to see this at the Institute of Anorganic and Analytical Chemistry.
    © CiM - Wilfried Hiegemann
  • How hard is my tap water? The children were also able to analyse this using chemical methods.
    © CiM - Wilfried Hiegemann
  • Fly larvae under the microscope. Not something you see every day.
    © CiM - Wilfried Hiegemann
  • Using an atomic force microscope made of Lego, participants were able to scan the surface of a coin at the Institute of Physiology II.
    © CiM - Wilfried Hiegemann
  • How are germs transmitted by shaking hands? Black light was used to show how, at the Institute of Molecular Virology.
    © CiM - Wilfried Hiegemann
  • To be a proper virus researcher, of course, protective clothing had to be worn…
    © CiM - Wilfried Hiegemann
  • … done! The experiments can now begin.
    © CiM - Wilfried Hiegemann
  • One of the things tomorrow’s scientists saw at the Institute of Medical Biochemistry was a human umbilical cord.
    © CiM - Wilfried Hiegemann
  • Looks just like in a kitchen – but it’s part of a biochemical experiment: DNA can be extracted from tomatoes.
    © CiM - Wilfried Hiegemann
  • Yeast cultures in petri dishes: at the Institute of Cell Dynamics and Imaging the children were able to “paint” their own cultures…
    © CiM - Wilfried Hiegemann
  • …and scientists from the Institute explained how to do it.
    © CiM - Wilfried Hiegemann
  • Visiting a fish laboratory: at the Institute of Cell Biology, CiM researchers use zebra fish to study how a body grows and develops.
    © CiM - Wilfried Hiegemann
  • A small souvenir of the Open Day: each child was given a flip book to take home with them.
    © CiM - Wilfried Hiegemann

Look back 2016

CiM laboratories once again opened their doors in 2016. There was a lot to discover, with the young researchers taking a look through microscopes, taking part in chemical experiments or extracting DNA.

Photos

Open Day for children and parents: On 3 October 2015, many CiM institutes took part in the “Türöffner-Tag”.
© CiM - Peter Grewer
  • Using an atomic force microscope made of Lego pieces, “young scientists” analyse the surface of a penny in the Institute of Physiology II.
    © CiM - Peter Grewer
  • A load test shows how much oxygen the cells of a human body can absorb.
    © CiM - Peter Grewer
  • In the Centre for Molecular Biology (ZMBE), different institutes welcome their young guests.
    © CiM - Peter Grewer
  • Dressed in lab coats, they “painted” motifs with yeast on a nutrient solution.
    © CiM - Peter Grewer
  • The “junior researchers” did a lot of lab work, even if their lab coats where a little too big.
    © CiM - Peter Grewer
  • Here, the young lab visitors extract DNA from tomatoes.
    © CiM - Peter Grewer
  • Which genes are responsible for the development of an organism? CiM scientists analyse cells on the move in a zebrafish.
    © CiM - Peter Grewer
  • Many thousand zebrafish live in the ZMBE’s fish farm.
    © CiM - Peter Grewer
  • At the Core Unit Proteomics, everything is about clinical research involving proteins. Here kids could try out the basic manoeuvres for themselves.
    © CiM - Peter Grewer
  • What do stones consist of? In the Institute for Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, visitors found out using X-rays.
    © CiM - Peter Grewer
  • Male or female fly larvae? With the naked eye, you can barely tell.
    © CiM - Peter Grewer
  • In the Institute for Physiological Chemistry and Pathobiochemistry, kids view the tissue structure of bones under a microscope.
    © CiM - Peter Grewer

Look back 2015

In 2015, kids and parents learned about virus and cancer research, X-ray devices and further topics.